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What Does it Mean to be GOTS Certified?

Becoming GOTS certified (or Global Organic Textile Standard) is by no means easy, but to us there is no other way. GOTS helps ensure that our organic cotton is sourced in the most ethical and sustainable ways from seed, to stitch, and finally, to sleep. 

Boll & Branch products are organic certified by Control Union CU834097. If you’d like to learn more, keep reading!

 

What is GOTS?

The Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) is the worldwide leading textile processing standard for organic fibres, including ecological and social criteria, backed up by independent certification of the entire textile supply chain.

Version 5.0 was published on 1st of March 2017, 3 years after the Version 4.0 was introduced and 12 years after the launch of the 1st Version. The high ecological and social requirements as well as word-wide practicability and verifiability were considered in the revision work, in order to achieve a reliable and transparent set of criteria.

The information in this section provides an overview of the content and basic requirements of the standard. It does not reflect all criteria of the standard and can therefore not be used for any official purpose.

 

What is their aim?

The aim of the standard is to define world-wide recognized requirements that ensure organic status of textiles, from harvesting of the raw materials, through environmentally and socially responsible manufacturing up to labelling in order to provide a credible assurance to the end consumer.
Textile processors and manufacturers are enabled to export their organic fabrics and garments with one certification accepted in all major markets.

 

What is their criteria?

The consensus of the Founding Organizations was that a clear and unambiguous understanding of the content required that the Global Standard itself focuses on compulsory criteria only. The standard covers the processing, manufacturing, packaging, labelling, trading and distribution of all textiles made from at least 70% certified organic natural fibres. The final products may include, but are not limited to fibre products, yarns, fabrics, clothes and home textiles. The standard does not set criteria for leather products.

 

Fibre Production

The key criteria for fibre production can be identified as:


Processing and Manufacturing

Key criteria for processing and manufacturing include:

 

Environmental Criteria

 

Technical Quality and Human Toxicity Criteria

 

Social Criteria

Social criteria based on the key norms of the International Labour Organisation (ILO) must be met by all processors and manufacturers. They must have a social compliance management with defined elements in place to ensure that the social criteria can be met. For adequate implementation and assessment of the following social criteria topics the listed applicable key conventions of the International Labour Organization (ILO) have to be taken as the relevant basis for interpretation.